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Obamacare Medication Cheap Tricks- Generics- Insurance

Aetna Site is Down- Insurance Obamacare Regulated Prescriptions To Generic.

Medications have been changed, repeatedly, from name brands to generics on Aetna. And from generic to generic without consulting the patients over the changes or offering alternatives.

My pharmacy has informed me that they only carry one brand of medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.  The new generic brand has an offensive odor to it. The pharmacist tells me that all the Metformin pills have that odor, but I never had any before with the odor. The odor pill has a number on it R-102. The last pills before that I used had a number IP -218. What is that? IP?

Medication humor?

The name brand that I took before being regulated to generic, with a choice, before, didn’t have an odor to it.

I contacted my doctor to get a change in the meds because I actually took the new pills for two days before noticing my blood sugar levels had gone up to 180 and 147 respectively. I then called the pharmacist to tell him that they sent me the wrong meds. He told me it was just a different brand but that if there was a problem with the manufacturer they would eventually investigate. (Legislate)

The government will legislate the  need for the legislation to possibly order an inquiry into a needs to possibly look into the problem and decide if more committees need to be set up to analyze the problem to warrant more legislation.

The lobbyists tell them what to do.

So another Obamacare trick to start people off with name brand meds and then to be forced into generics and then forced into lesser quality generics. The lesser quality generics will probably work but you have to take three times the amount to get the same effect. Older people might make a mistake and get back on their normal brands after being put on the three for one dose and then overdose.

Companies make more money that way, though. With Obamacare that’s the important part.

I’ll be calling my doctor…

I believe that in the case of life threatening  conditions the pills patients need should be the name brands for the cost of generics.

exterim
“Have a crappy day!”
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